It is time for healthy living priorities to be integrated into Indigenous housing policy and practice: a reply to ‘Aboriginal social housing in remote Australia: crowded, unrepaired and raising the risk of infectious diseases’ by Paul Memmott et al

It is time for healthy living priorities to be integrated into Indigenous housing policy and practice: a reply to ‘Aboriginal social housing in remote Australia: crowded, unrepaired and raising the risk of infectious diseases’ by Paul Memmott et al Journal Article

Global Discourse

  • Author(s): Habibis, Daphne
  • Published: 2022
  • Publisher: Bristol University Press
  • Volume: 12

Abstract: This is a reply to Memmott et al’s (2022) article on ‘Aboriginal social housing in remote Australia: crowded, unrepaired and raising the risk of infectious diseases’. It is not hard to see that the physical environment of the home is likely to have a significant impact on health. Problems such as leaking toilets, uneven stairs, mouldy walls and crowding clearly create health-and-safety risks. This relationship is recognised in World Health Organization (WHO, 2018) housing and health guidelines, with crowding identified as increasing risks to mental and physical health. These problems disproportionately affect low-income renters, who have limited capacity to remedy such issues (Robinson and Adams, 2008). This relationship between housing and mental and physical well-being significantly contributes to intergenerational poverty (McKnight and Cowell, 2014).

Cite this document

Suggested Citation
Habibis, Daphne, 2022, It is time for healthy living priorities to be integrated into Indigenous housing policy and practice: a reply to ‘Aboriginal social housing in remote Australia: crowded, unrepaired and raising the risk of infectious diseases’ by Paul Memmott et al, Volume:12, Journal Article, viewed 23 July 2024, https://www.nintione.com.au/?p=30626.

Endnote Mendeley Zotero Export Google Scholar

Share this page

Search again