Uptake and acceptability of human papillomavirus self-sampling in rural and remote aboriginal communities: evaluation of a nurse-led community engagement model

Uptake and acceptability of human papillomavirus self-sampling in rural and remote aboriginal communities: evaluation of a nurse-led community engagement model Journal Article

BMC Health Services Research

  • Author(s): Dutton, Tegan, Marjoram, Jo, Burgess, Shellie, Montgomery, Laurinne, Vail, Anne, Callan, Nichole, Jacob, Sunil, Hawkes, David, Saville, Marion, Bailey, Jannine
  • Published: 2020
  • Volume: 20
  • ISBN: 1472-6963

Abstract: Background: Aboriginal women experience disproportionately higher rates of cervical cancer mortality yet are less likely to participate in screening for early detection. This study sought to determine whether a community-based HPV self-sampling service model can effectively recruit never-screened and under-screened Aboriginal women to participate in cervical cancer screening; assess the clinical outcomes; and explore the acceptability of the model from the perspective of the participants. Methods: Aboriginal women aged 25–69 years of age were recruited from eight rural and remote communities in New South Wales, Australia to participate in HPV self-sampling via a community-based service model. Outcome measures were: number of women screened by HPV self-sampling, their prior cervical screening status (under-screened or never-screened), clinical outcomes and participation in follow-up pathways of care, and satisfaction with the service model. Results: In total, 215 women conducted a HPV self-sampling test and 200 evaluation surveys were completed. One-fifth of participants (n = 46) were never-screened and one-third (n = 69) were under-screened. Many were unsure of their screening status. Nine women were HPV 16/18 positive and eight had completed all follow up by the conclusion of the study. A further 30 women tested positive for a high risk type other than HPV 16/18 (HPV other), of which 14 had completed follow up at the conclusion of the study. Satisfaction with the HPV self-sampling kit, the process of self-sampling and the service model was high (> 92% satisfied on all items). Many women had difficulty understanding their official HPV results and placed high importance on the nurse explaining it to them. Conclusions: A community-based service model that respects Aboriginal Women’s Business can effectively recruit under-screened and never-screened Aboriginal women to complete cervical cancer screening. Furthermore, this service model supports them to complete recommended follow-up care and engage with their local existing health services.

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Suggested Citation
Dutton, Tegan, Marjoram, Jo, Burgess, Shellie, Montgomery, Laurinne, Vail, Anne, Callan, Nichole, Jacob, Sunil, Hawkes, David, Saville, Marion, Bailey, Jannine, 2020, Uptake and acceptability of human papillomavirus self-sampling in rural and remote aboriginal communities: evaluation of a nurse-led community engagement model, Volume:20, Journal Article, viewed 23 July 2024, https://www.nintione.com.au/?p=25486.

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