Time to listen: Chronic disease yarning with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples living in remote Australia

Time to listen: Chronic disease yarning with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples living in remote Australia Journal Article

Collegian

  • Author(s): Rheault, Haunnah, Coyer, Fiona, Bonner, Ann
  • Published: 2020
  • ISBN: 1322-7696

Abstract: Background Chronic disease affects Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples at a disproportionately higher level and at younger ages, particularly for those living in remote locations, than for the overall Australian population. Aim To examine the perceptions and experiences of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adults residing in remote North West Queensland regarding chronic disease education, and how they self-manage their health. Methods Semi-structured open ended ‘yarning’ interviews were conducted between March and May 2017 with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adults (n = 20) with a medical diagnosis of a chronic disease/s. Interviews focussed on their views and experiences in receiving information regarding their chronic disease/s, self-management education, and how they engaged with healthcare professionals. Data were subjected to thematic analysis. Findings Three themes emerged: 1) It’s going to happen, 2) Communication as a Barrier and Facilitator, and 3) Recognising the Past and Looking Forward. Chronic disease was described as inevitable, and that communication between patient and healthcare professionals was compromised due to the constant use of medical terminology by healthcare professionals. Yarning as a strategy for patient education was suggested as a way to strengthen the relationship with healthcare professionals and to assist with chronic disease self-management abilities. Discussion For Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians, communication, particularly whilst delivering healthcare is an important factor in providing effective support to improve health outcomes. Conclusion To help improve health literacy and to build trusting relationships, healthcare professionals should adopt culturally appropriate and effective communication rather than simply relying on individuals’ functional health literacy skills.

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Suggested Citation
Rheault, Haunnah, Coyer, Fiona, Bonner, Ann, 2020, Time to listen: Chronic disease yarning with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples living in remote Australia, Journal Article, viewed 15 July 2024, https://www.nintione.com.au/?p=19226.

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