There was movement at the station: western education at Moola Bulla, 1910-1955

There was movement at the station: western education at Moola Bulla, 1910-1955 Journal Article

History of Education Review

  • Author(s): Povey, Rhonda
  • Secondary Author(s): Trudgett, Michelle
  • Published: 2019
  • Publisher: Emerald Publishing Limited
  • Volume: 48
  • ISBN: 0819-8691

Abstract: Purpose The focus of this paper is to centre the lived experiences and perceptions of western education held by Aboriginal people who lived at Moola Bulla Native Cattle Station (Moola Bulla) in Western Australia, between 1910 and 1955. Of interest is an investigation into how government legislations and policies influenced these experiences and perceptions. The purpose of this paper is to promote the powerful narrative that simultaneously acknowledges injustice and honours Aboriginal agency.Design/methodology/approach The research from which this paper is drawn moves away from colonial, paternalistic and racist interpretations of history; it is designed to decolonise the narrative of Aboriginal education in remote Western Australia. The research uses the wide and deep angle lens of qualitative historical research, filtered by decolonising methodologies and standpoint theory. Simultaneously, the paper valorises the contributions Indigenous academics are making to the decolonisation of historical research.Findings Preliminary findings suggest the narrative told by the residents who were educated at Moola Bulla support a reframing of previous deficit misrepresentations of indigeneity into strength-based narratives. These narratives, or “counter stories”, articulate resistance to colonial master narratives.Social implications This paper argues that listening to Aboriginal lived experiences and perceptions of western education from the past will better inform our engagement with the delivery of equitable educational opportunities for Aboriginal students in remote contexts in the future.Originality/value This paper will contribute to the wider academic community by addressing accountability in Aboriginal education. Most important to the study is the honouring of the participants and families of those who once lived on Moola Bulla, many who are speaking back through the telling of their story.

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Suggested Citation
Povey, Rhonda, 2019, There was movement at the station: western education at Moola Bulla, 1910-1955, Volume:48, Journal Article, viewed 15 August 2022, https://www.nintione.com.au/?p=15306.

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