The effects of New Living on Indigenous wellbeing: a case study of urban renewal

The effects of New Living on Indigenous wellbeing: a case study of urban renewal Report

AHURI Final Report No. 99

  • Author(s): Walker, R., Ballard, J., Taylor, C., Hillier, J.
  • Published: 2007
  • Publisher: Australian Housing and Urban Research Institute

Abstract: The research analyses the impact of state public housing estate regeneration on Indigenous households in urban communities in WA from the perspectives of government agencies and the residents themselves. It assessed the importance of place and the effects of regeneration schemes on Indigenous households including: incoming residents, remaining public sector residents and those displaced by the urban regeneration process. The evidence suggests that displaced Indigenous households suffer disproportionately, psychologically and physically, from moves caused by estate regeneration. There is also evidence to suggest that the more specific needs of Indigenous communities, families and individuals are largely overlooked in current urban regeneration practices. Strong unbroken kinship networks and face-to-face relationships are important for Indigenous households and this study will help understand how these contribute to stronger sustainable communities and other non-shelter outcomes.

Notes: This research project sought to analyse the impact of state public housing regeneration on Indigenous households in urban communities in WA from the perspectives of agencies of governance and the residents themselves. It aimed to ascertain the importance of place and the effects of regeneration schemes on Indigenous households: incoming residents, remaining public sector residents and those displaced by the urban regeneration process. Initial evidence suggests that displaced Indigenous households suffer disproportionately, psychologically and physically, from moves caused by estate regeneration. Although community renewal in disadvantaged areas is high on the national agenda for action no systematic research has been undertaken to look specifically at the positive and negative implications for individual, family and community wellbeing of Indigenous Australians. Indeed, there is considerable evidence to suggest that the more specific needs of Indigenous communities, families and individuals are largely overlooked in current urban regeneration practices. Strong unbroken kinship networks and face-to-face relationships are important for Indigenous households and this study will help understand how these contribute to stronger sustainable communities and other non-shelter outcomes.

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Walker, R., Ballard, J., Taylor, C., Hillier, J., 2007, The effects of New Living on Indigenous wellbeing: a case study of urban renewal, Report, viewed 19 August 2022, https://www.nintione.com.au/?p=4255.

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