The brumby dance episode: On the value of cultural continuity within the localised complexity of remote Indigenous education

The brumby dance episode: On the value of cultural continuity within the localised complexity of remote Indigenous education Journal Article

Australian Aboriginal Studies

  • Author(s): Spillman, David
  • Published: 2018
  • Volume: 1

Abstract: The brumby dance episode occurred as a Warlpiri-inspired response to an emotionally charged conversation regarding the Northern Territory Emergency Response. It took place during the Cross-Cultural Collaboration Project, undertaken in the Northern Territory Department of Education, Employment and Training in 2008. This paper contextualises, describes and analyses the brumby dance episode, examining the perspectives and intentions underlying its enactment. This analysis proposes the brumby dance episode as an exemplar of the great value of cultural continuity processes in bringing traditional Aboriginal ways of knowing, doing and being to the localised complexity of contemporary Indigenous education in Australia, particularly in remote settings. Such strongly relational, strength-based approaches are juxtaposed with those of the currently dominant standardisation policy agenda in Indigenous education, critiqued as over-simplistic (one size fits all), deficit-focused and relationally impoverished.

Cite this document

Suggested Citation
Spillman, David, 2018, The brumby dance episode: On the value of cultural continuity within the localised complexity of remote Indigenous education, Volume:1, Journal Article, viewed 09 August 2022, https://www.nintione.com.au/?p=13291.

Endnote Mendeley Zotero Export Google Scholar

Share this page

Search again