The Anti-Festival: Kimberley Aboriginal cultural politics and the artful business of creating spaces for Kardiya to hear and feel across difference

The Anti-Festival: Kimberley Aboriginal cultural politics and the artful business of creating spaces for Kardiya to hear and feel across difference Book Section

Ethical Responsiveness and the Politics of Difference

  • Author(s): Slater, Lisa
  • Secondary Author(s): Dreher, Tanja, Mondal, Anshuman A.
  • Published: 2018
  • Publisher: Springer International Publishing
  • ISBN: 978-3-319-93958-2

Abstract: Slater’s focus is settler Australia’s inability to hear Aboriginal people on their own terms. The chapter explores a five-day cultural immersion and knowledge programme—run at the KALACC festival, Kimberley, Western Australia—in which government and non-government agencies were invited to ‘listen in’ to how traditional owners envision the ‘problems’ and ‘solutions’ to pressing issues in their lives, and how the grant-makers might support community-driven solutions. The festival is an untranslatable space—an anti-festival—in which the Kimberley Aboriginal world is not readily accessible and understandable to non-Indigenous people. She examines the event as an invitation for non-Indigenous Australians to recognise their crisis of hearing and listen across difference. Ethical listening, and thus transforming the foundations of settler colonialism, requires creating spaces for respectful non-comprehension.

Cite this document

Suggested Citation
Slater, Lisa, 2018, The Anti-Festival: Kimberley Aboriginal cultural politics and the artful business of creating spaces for Kardiya to hear and feel across difference, Book Section, viewed 10 August 2022, https://www.nintione.com.au/?p=13610.

Endnote Mendeley Zotero Export Google Scholar

Share this page

Search again