‘Sometime they run away, that’s how scared they feel’: The paediatric hospitalisation experiences of Indigenous families from remote areas of Australia

‘Sometime they run away, that’s how scared they feel’: The paediatric hospitalisation experiences of Indigenous families from remote areas of Australia Journal Article

Contemporary Nurse

  • Author(s): Laura Tanner, Kendall Agius, Philip Darbyshire
  • Published: 2005
  • Volume: 18

Abstract: Hospitalisation can be a traumatic experience for any child and family but the experience can be significantly more so for Indigenous parents and children from remote areas of Australia. Despite the importance of this issue for child and family health and for Indigenous health, the hospitalisation experiences of Indigenous families and children have received almost no research attention. This paper describes selected findings from a recently completed Honours research study which used the participatory and collaborative Indigenous research approach of Dadirri to explore this question. Following a brief description of the methodology of Dadirri, the paper presents the participating families' depictions of their experiences of 'Coming Down' and 'Being in Hospital', where they revealed the extent and effects of marked culture shock. The significant cultural differences between staff and Indigenous families contributed to the parents' sense of fear, powerlessness and isolation from their child, home community and culture. For these families this isolation was not merely geographic but intricately linked to their health and wellbeing.

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Suggested Citation
Laura Tanner, Kendall Agius, Philip Darbyshire, 2005, ‘Sometime they run away, that’s how scared they feel’: The paediatric hospitalisation experiences of Indigenous families from remote areas of Australia, Volume:18, Journal Article, viewed 15 August 2022, https://www.nintione.com.au/?p=2999.

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