Sharing the Benefits of Commercialisation of Traditional Knowledge: What are the Key Success Factors?

Sharing the Benefits of Commercialisation of Traditional Knowledge: What are the Key Success Factors? Report

Intellectual Property Forum

  • Author(s): Rajul Joshi, John Chelliah
  • Published: 2013

Abstract: Traditional knowledge is a significant contributor to the global knowledge base. Traditional knowledge can be defined as beliefs, practices and knowledge of the traditional community. Predominantly, this knowledge is non-documented know-how, techniques, practices and innovation which is produced through local institutions to solve local problems, manage resources and deal with uncertainties in the environment as well as social interactions. Traditional knowledge is often synonymously used with the term indigenous knowledge. However, indigenous knowledge is generally viewed as a subset of traditional knowledge, which is possessed and used by indigenous communities. “Traditional knowledge system” has been an integral and popular source of value to natural resource management, agriculture, health care and farming.

Notes: refer also to Indigenous Knowledge Forum

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Suggested Citation
Rajul Joshi, John Chelliah, 2013, Sharing the Benefits of Commercialisation of Traditional Knowledge: What are the Key Success Factors?, Report, viewed 08 August 2022, https://www.nintione.com.au/?p=3458.

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