Report into the Rural, Regional and Remote Areas Lawyers Survey

Report into the Rural, Regional and Remote Areas Lawyers Survey Report

  • Author(s): Law Council of Australia and the Law Institute of Victoria
  • Published: 2009

Abstract: The Law Council is concerned that ongoing problems in recruiting and retaining legal practitioners in country Australia is negatively impacting on the ability of individuals residing in rural, regional and remote (RRR) areas to access legal services. Like many other professional groups, such as doctors and nurses, lawyers in regional areas are experiencing increasing difficulties in attracting and retaining suitable staff. These recruitment problems have a direct effect on the legal sector’s ability to service the legal needs of regional communities. Many law firms and community legal centres are unable to find suitable lawyers to fill vacancies when they arise and are being impeded by the drain of corporate knowledge caused by a constant turnover of staff. There is also evidence to suggest that this situation will deteriorate further in the next five to ten years as a large number of experienced principals retire. In March 2009, the Law Council coordinated a nationwide survey of legal practitioners in RRR areas. The survey was conducted in order to obtain empirical support for anecdotal evidence which indicates that there is a shortage of legal practitioners in regional areas of Australia. The online survey was sent by the law societies in each state and the Northern Territory to their members working in RRR areas. Practitioners were given four weeks to complete the survey. The survey elicited strong support from the country legal community with a response rate of 24% (in total 1,185 practitioners completed the survey).

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Suggested Citation
Law Council of Australia and the Law Institute of Victoria, 2009, Report into the Rural, Regional and Remote Areas Lawyers Survey, Report, viewed 13 August 2022, https://www.nintione.com.au/?p=2596.

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