Recovery action implementation for threatened arid acacias: distribution, monitoring and Indigenous ecological knowledge of A. peuce, A. undoolyana, A. pickardii and A. latzii

Recovery action implementation for threatened arid acacias: distribution, monitoring and Indigenous ecological knowledge of A. peuce, A. undoolyana, A. pickardii and A. latzii Report

  • Author(s): Nano, C., Nano, T., Gibson, J., Pavey, C.
  • Published: 2009
  • Publisher: Department of Natural Resources, Environment and the Arts, Northern Territory

Abstract: 1. The project implemented three key actions from the ‘National recovery plan for threatened Acacias and Ricinocarpos gloria-medii in central Australia’; specifically to: carry out targeted surveys for additional populations of Acacia latzii and Acacia pickardii in the NT and SA; carry out population and habitat monitoring at selected sites for these two species, Acacia peuce and Acacia undoolyana; and engage Indigenous ecologists to provide input into the recovery process. 2. Targeted surveys extended the extent of occurrence of both the northern and southern populations of Acacia latzii; in the case of the southern population this involved a large increase. Thirty-three individual stands of Acacia pickardii were mapped on Andado Station and knowledge of the species’ distribution was refined. 3. Monitoring programs were set-up and the first round of monitoring completed for each of the four Acacia species. The number of monitoring plots established for each species was: Acacia peuce, 24; Acacia latzii, 5; Acacia pickardii, 4; Acacia undoolyana, 6. 4. The monitoring program for each species targets the most vulnerable life history stages and is designed to maximise the ability to determine negative trends, to assess the effectiveness of specific management actions and to best use scarce human and financial resources. In most cases monitoring is recommended at intervals of five years. 5. Indigenous ecological knowledge was sought and recorded for each species by working with Traditional Owners and other knowledgeable Indigenous people and by assessing the existing literature and unpublished records of anthropologists, linguists, and ethno-biologists. This assessment also included understanding the significance of each species in Aboriginal mythology. 6. Completion of this project is a significant step in ensuring the recovery of the four threatened Acacia species.

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Suggested Citation
Nano, C., Nano, T., Gibson, J., Pavey, C., 2009, Recovery action implementation for threatened arid acacias: distribution, monitoring and Indigenous ecological knowledge of A. peuce, A. undoolyana, A. pickardii and A. latzii, Report, viewed 09 August 2022, https://www.nintione.com.au/?p=2855.

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