Recommendations for designing health information technologies for mental health drawn from self-determination theory and co-design with culturally diverse populations: Template analysis

Recommendations for designing health information technologies for mental health drawn from self-determination theory and co-design with culturally diverse populations: Template analysis Journal Article

Journal of Medical Internet Research

  • Author(s): Cheng, Vanessa Wan Sze, Piper, Sarah E., Ottavio, Antonia, Davenport, Tracey A., Hickie, Ian B.
  • Published: 2021
  • Volume: 23
  • ISBN: 1438-8871

Abstract: Background: Culturally diverse populations (including Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, people of diverse genders and sexualities, and culturally and linguistically diverse people) in nonurban areas face compounded barriers to accessing mental health care. Health information technologies (HITs) show promising potential to overcome these barriers. Objective: This study aims to identify how best to improve a mental health and well-being HIT for culturally diverse Australians in nonurban areas. Methods: We conducted 10 co-design workshops (N=105 participants) in primary youth mental health services across predominantly nonurban areas of Australia and conducted template analysis on the workshop outputs. Owing to local (including service) demographics, the workshop participants naturalistically reflected culturally diverse groups. Results: We identified 4 main themes: control, usability, affirmation, and health service delivery factors. The first 3 themes overlap with the 3 basic needs postulated by self-determination theory (autonomy, competence, and relatedness) and describe participant recommendations on how to design an HIT. The final theme includes barriers to adopting HITs for mental health care and how HITs can be used to support care coordination and delivery. Hence, it describes participant recommendations on how to use an HIT. Conclusions: Although culturally diverse groups have specific concerns, their expressed needs fall broadly within the relatively universal design principles identified in this study. The findings of this study provide further support for applying self-determination theory to the design of HITs and reflect the tension in designing technologies for complex problems that overlap multiple medical, regulatory, and social domains, such as mental health care. Finally, we synthesize the identified themes into general recommendations for designing HITs for mental health and provide concrete examples of design features recommended by participants.

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Suggested Citation
Cheng, Vanessa Wan Sze, Piper, Sarah E., Ottavio, Antonia, Davenport, Tracey A., Hickie, Ian B., 2021, Recommendations for designing health information technologies for mental health drawn from self-determination theory and co-design with culturally diverse populations: Template analysis, Volume:23, Journal Article, viewed 22 October 2021, https://www.nintione.com.au/?p=23546.

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