Policy, institutional and managerial considerations in managing weeds with a commercial value

Policy, institutional and managerial considerations in managing weeds with a commercial value Report

  • Author(s): R.L. Miles, S. Kinnear, M. Friedel, A.C. Grice, R.D. van Klinken, S. Setterfield, M. Herpich
  • Tertiary Author(s): Australian Government
  • Published: 2009
  • Publisher: Land & Water Australia

Abstract: In Australia, governments spend approximately $116.4 million on weed management, monitoring and research each year1. This figure does not include resources provided by volunteers or weed management undertaken as a component of other landcare activities, nor costs incurred by agricultural industries as a result of weeds. In recent years a wider recognition of the economic, biological and social impacts of weeds has resulted in a greater commitment and investment in weed management. However, the management of plant species that have significant economic value but are, at the same time, invasive has received little attention. For convenience, these species are referred to here as ‘commercial weeds’. Pastoralists, farmers, conservationists, traditional landholders and local councils are all concerned about weeds and their impact but they often have different perceptions about individual species. In part, this is due to socio-economic factors. Conflicting views of the benefits and costs of commercial weeds have inhibited the holistic or coordinated approach to managing or controlling these plants. A poor knowledge of the offsite impacts of these species on other land uses and the environment continues to impede the development and implementation of effective management strategies. This, combined with the complexity of relevant policies and regulations, means that commercial weeds present problems that require cooperation between individual landholders, sectors, jurisdictions and government agencies. Several research projects funded within the Defeating the Weed Menace (DWM) program provide valuable insights into the ways in which these issues might be addressed, pointing to the possibility of national approaches that take account of sectoral and regional differences.

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Suggested Citation
R.L. Miles, S. Kinnear, M. Friedel, A.C. Grice, R.D. van Klinken, S. Setterfield, M. Herpich, 2009, Policy, institutional and managerial considerations in managing weeds with a commercial value, Report, viewed 10 August 2022, https://www.nintione.com.au/?p=3513.

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