National Climate Change Adaptation Research Plan for Indigenous Communities

National Climate Change Adaptation Research Plan for Indigenous Communities Report

  • Author(s): Langton, M., Parsons, M., Leonard, S., Auty, K., Bell, D., Burgess, P., Edwards, S., Howitt, R., Jackson, S., McGrath, V., Morrison, J.
  • Secondary Author(s): National Climate Change Adaptation Research Facility,
  • Published: 2012

Abstract: This National Climate Change Adaptation Research Plan (NARP) identifies the research that is needed to enhance understanding of climate change adaptation for Australia’s Indigenous communities. For the purposes of this NARP, Indigenous communities include both discrete Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders living in other locales, whether remote, regional, peri-urban, or urban. This NARP outlines priority research areas that will inform decisions about adaptation to produce effective, efficient and equitable strategies and outcomes. Identification of priority areas will enable local, state/territory and Australian governments, as well as other research investors, to fund research over the next five years, which will deliver the maximum benefit to Indigenous communities throughout Australia and provide a broad framework for longer-term research planning. This NARP is designed to be cross-sectoral and incorporates key research areas not identified in the other eight NARPs, which are of critical importance to the future climate change adaptation planning needs of Australian Indigenous communities. Research on climate change and Indigenous communities, including the impacts – factors affecting vulnerability and adaptive capacity – and adaptation for Indigenous communities has been limited. Most existing research has focused on identifying the biophysical impacts of climate change. Few studies have explored the vulnerability and adaptive capacity of Indigenous individuals, households, communities, businesses and institutions. Accordingly, there is a need for research that expands knowledge about these and other dimensions of Indigenous adaptation to climate change. The development of a theoretical and empirical knowledge base will inform decision-making about adaptation by individuals, households, communities, businesses, institutions and governments. This NARP identifies five broad categories of information necessary to enhance decision-making about climate change adaptation for Indigenous Australians. There is a need for research that enhances understanding of: 1. The sensitivity and exposure of Indigenous individuals, households, communities, businesses and institutions to climate risks 2. The vulnerability and adaptive capacity of Indigenous individuals, households, communities, businesses and institutions to climate change 3. Extreme weather events and emergency management planning for Indigenous communities 4. Indigenous population movement, displacement, community relocation and severe climate variation 5. Climate change adaptation and Indigenous biodiversity management. Within these five categories, thirteen research topics have been identified. As with all National Climate Change Adaptation Research Plans, these research topics are prioritised according to: - The severity of the potential impact to be addressed - The degree of potential benefit that could be derived - The immediacy of the required intervention or response - The degree to which the research will lead to practical and achievable interventions or responses - The potential to produce benefits beyond informing climate change adaptation strategies - The extent to which the research addresses more than one issue or sector - The extent to which the research addresses the needs of the most vulnerable groups.

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Suggested Citation
Langton, M., Parsons, M., Leonard, S., Auty, K., Bell, D., Burgess, P., Edwards, S., Howitt, R., Jackson, S., McGrath, V., Morrison, J., 2012, National Climate Change Adaptation Research Plan for Indigenous Communities, Report, viewed 09 August 2022, https://www.nintione.com.au/?p=3797.

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