Learning from follow-up of student placements in a remote community: a small qualitative study highlights personal and workforce benefits and opportunities

Learning from follow-up of student placements in a remote community: a small qualitative study highlights personal and workforce benefits and opportunities Journal Article

BMC Medical Education

  • Author(s): Thackrah, Rosalie D., Thompson, Sandra C.
  • Published: 2019
  • Volume: 19
  • ISBN: 1472-6920

Abstract: The maldistribution of the Australian health workforce contributes to restricted accessibility and poorer health outcomes for rural and remote populations, especially Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians. Student exposure to rural and remote settings is a long-term strategy that aims to reduce workforce shortages by encouraging rural career uptake, with well-supervised, positive placement experiences associated with rural practice intentions. Furthermore, placements can build students’ cultural capabilities and foster interest in working with disadvantaged and underserved Aboriginal communities. However, little is known about the translation of rural practice intentions to career paths, and the factors influencing employment decision-making and application of clinical and cultural content to professional practice.

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Suggested Citation
Thackrah, Rosalie D., Thompson, Sandra C., 2019, Learning from follow-up of student placements in a remote community: a small qualitative study highlights personal and workforce benefits and opportunities, Volume:19, Journal Article, viewed 15 August 2022, https://www.nintione.com.au/?p=15758.

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