Incentives for sustainable land management: Community cost sharing to conserve biodiversity on private lands: A guide for local government revised edition

Incentives for sustainable land management: Community cost sharing to conserve biodiversity on private lands: A guide for local government revised edition Book

  • Author(s): Bateson, Paul
  • Published: 2001
  • Publisher: Environment Australia and Environs Australia
  • ISBN: 0642547251

Abstract: Across Australia, people working the land are taking the next steps toward sustainable land management. This is in response to widespread acknowledgement that poor native vegetation management is affecting the economic well being of whole communities through decline in farm productivity, and is causing biodiversity loss, ecosystem decay and loss of habitat. Local government is in a powerful position to establish incentive schemes that encourage private landholders to become partners in conserving biodiversity, particularly remnant vegetation, as part of sustainable land management and farm production. Incentives are part of an integrated approach that includes planning, regulation, education, and encouragement of community participation in a partnership between private landholders and governments. Broadly speaking, the offer and take-up of financial assistance is an acknowledgement that the community, through local government, is willing to help with the cost of conserving biodiversity on private lands

Notes: * Summary * Part A Introduction o Why should councils be involved in conserving biodiversity? o Benefits of biodiversity and sustainable land management o How can councils help? o What incentives and related mechanisms are we talking about? * Part B How to Implement a Financial Incentives Scheme o Stage 1 Development + Step One Getting started + Step Two Assess the financial implications and funding opportunities + Step Three Set up your framework for implementation o Stage 2 Implementation + Step Four Promote and market to landholders + Step Five Implement your scheme with landholders o Stage 3 Monitoring and Evaluation + Step Six Evaluate your scheme + Step Seven Assess cost-benefit * Part C - Case Studies o Cairns City Council, Queensland - land management agreements o Cooloola Shire Council, Queensland - environmentally significant areas strategy o Coorong District Council, South Australia - local action plan o Melton Shire Council, Victoria - environmental enhancement policy program o City of Manningham, Victoria - local environmental assistance fund * References and further reading Appendices 1. Potential funding opportunities 2. Local incentive schemes and environmental levies 3. Link-up: useful contacts and support networks 4. Some examples of incentives scheme assessment and application forms (incent5.pdf - 185 KB) available as PDF file only. 5. Example of non-binding management agreement (contract) (incent5.pdf - 185 KB) available as PDF file only. Tables 1. Native vegetation that benefits farm production and biodiversity conservation 2. Context of local government in biodiversity conservation on private land 3. Options for use of financial incentives 4. Options for use of property right mechanisms 5. Options for application of revenue raising mechanisms 6. Options for use of planning incentive mechanisms 7. Options for use of non-financial motivational incentives Figures 1. Steps for implementing a financial incentives scheme 2. Key ways to deliver incentives under council's overall strategy

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Bateson, Paul, 2001, Incentives for sustainable land management: Community cost sharing to conserve biodiversity on private lands: A guide for local government revised edition, Book, viewed 17 August 2022, https://www.nintione.com.au/?p=4106.

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