Implications of alternative feral goat management strategies for natural resource management policies in NSW rangelands

Implications of alternative feral goat management strategies for natural resource management policies in NSW rangelands Conference Paper

17th Australian Rangeland Society Biennial Conference

  • Author(s): S.A. Khairo, R.B. Hacker, T.L. Atkinson, G.L. Turnbull
  • Published: 2012
  • Publisher: Australian Rangeland Society

Abstract: This paper presents a brief summary of an economic analysis of alternative feral goat management strategies (no control, opportunistic harvesting, value added and goat-proof fencing) and their implications for natural resource management policies in NSW rangelands. Opportunistic and value added strategies are profitable for landholders. The profitability of investment in goat proof fencing to support livestock production could be comparable to current goat management practices if moderate increases in carrying capacity can be achieved through improved grazing management. Financial incentives that are based directly on measured resource condition (e.g. ground cover) and encourage investment in exclusion fencing and improved management would be preferable to incentives supporting goat harvesting activities. These activities are not necessarily favourable to resource conservation as they are driven by goat price rather than population and are, in any event, profitable for landholders. A ‘no control’ strategy has adverse economic consequences for pastoral properties.

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Suggested Citation
S.A. Khairo, R.B. Hacker, T.L. Atkinson, G.L. Turnbull, 2012, Implications of alternative feral goat management strategies for natural resource management policies in NSW rangelands, Conference Paper, viewed 10 August 2022, https://www.nintione.com.au/?p=3658.

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