Health service utilisation among Filipino women in remote Queensland, Australia

Health service utilisation among Filipino women in remote Queensland, Australia Journal Article

Rural and Remote Health

  • Author(s): Kelaher, M., Manderson, L., Potts, H.
  • Published: 2003
  • Volume: 3
  • Edition: 2005/05/10
  • ISBN: 1445-6354 (Electronic) 1445-6354 (Linking)

Abstract: INTRODUCTION: This paper will discuss health issues among Filipinas (women born in the Philippines) living in remote and rural environments in Queensland in comparison to Filipinas living in other parts of the state. The sample was recruited as part of the University of Queensland component of the Australian Longitudinal Study of Women's Health. Access to health services will be discussed in terms of the framework outlined by McKinley et al: (i) Knowledge (Availability) is measured in terms of consumers' knowledge about the services and consumers' confidence in being able to use the medical care they require; (ii) Accessibility is considered in terms of their location to the consumers in relation to the services (distance) and being able to physically get to them (transport); (iii) Affordability is measured in terms of the extent to which cost is seen as a barrier to service use; (iv) Accommodation is measured in terms of the extent to which service delivery arrangements are able to accommodate consumers' needs and the extent to which doctors' attitudes are seen to be accommodating of those needs. It would be expected that cultural and linguistic issues would primarily affect Knowledge and Accommodation. Differences in Accessibility and Affordability would be expected to be affected by location. Access to services in rural areas may be more difficult and dependent on personal transport. METHODS: The sample, consisting of women born in the Philippines, was recruited though community organizations as part of the University of Queensland component of the Australian Longitudinal Study of Women's Health. Most of the women lived in urban or semi-urban areas (391) and 90 lived in areas designated as rural or remote areas by Queensland Health. The overall response rate was 87% and 83%. RESULTS: There were no differences between urban and rural and remote women in terms of knowledge. However women living in rural and remote areas had greater difficulty getting their information needs met. Consequently problems caused by structural limitations of health service delivery were often exacerbated by differences in expectations of health services and lack of understanding of methods to optimise access to care. CONCLUSION: Many of the barriers experienced by migrant women in rural/ remote areas mirror those of other Australian women. However the results suggest that better information about health services and self-management may improve the interface between service providers and their clients.

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Suggested Citation
Kelaher, M., Manderson, L., Potts, H., 2003, Health service utilisation among Filipino women in remote Queensland, Australia, Edition:2005/05/10, Volume:3, Journal Article, viewed 10 August 2022, https://www.nintione.com.au/?p=13640.

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