Freight and chronic disease in remote Indigenous communities — the story of an apple from tree to table

Freight and chronic disease in remote Indigenous communities — the story of an apple from tree to table Conference Paper

9th National Rural Health Conference: Standing up for Rural Health - Learning from the past - Action for the future

  • Author(s): Ian Lovell
  • Published: 2007

Abstract: In this paper I have sought to raise awareness of how inextricably linked the health of remote Indigenous communities is to healthy foods and that freight is a critical element that cannot be ignored. When freight arrangements fail it brings all the other best efforts undone. I’ve also tried to show through the story of William the apple how cumulative mistakes in the supply chain can be compounded and how a better understanding and interest in cold chain and supply chain management can overcome this. Where are we now? The National Transport Forum has done a great deal to engage a number of communities that are actively improving their freight and perishable food supply chains, but they are the tip of the Iceberg. Understandably Health Agencies see freight as important but not part of their business and with the exception of South Australia it seems transport departments don’t have the expertise or resources to provide the practical on-ground help that is needed. Without help for remote Indigenous communities to improve freight we really are between the ‘devil and the deep blue sea’.

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Suggested Citation
Ian Lovell, 2007, Freight and chronic disease in remote Indigenous communities — the story of an apple from tree to table, Conference Paper, viewed 07 August 2022, https://www.nintione.com.au/?p=3202.

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