Food and nutrition policy issues in remote aboriginal communities: lessons from Arnhem Land

Food and nutrition policy issues in remote aboriginal communities: lessons from Arnhem Land Journal Article

Australian Journal of Public Health

  • Author(s): McMillan, S.J.
  • Published: 1991
  • Volume: 15
  • Edition: 1991/12/01
  • ISBN: 1035-7319 (Print) 1035-7319 (Linking)

Abstract: There is a high incidence of nutrition-related diseases amongst Aborigines living in remote areas. An outline of the corporate food and nutrition policy of the Arnhemland Progress Association is given to demonstrate the potential for positive strategies in remote area stores. The Association is a retailer owned by Aboriginal groups and operates 11 remote community stores. Factors such as price, Aboriginal buying habits, seasonality, consumer demand and most importantly remote area stock management affect the supply of and demand for food items. Further, government policy on sales tax and private sector capital city pricing policies influence retailing in remote areas. The experience of the Arnhemland Progress Association illustrates the extent to which factors affecting supply of and demand for food lie outside the health sector and points to the need for an intersectoral policy on food and nutrition.

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Suggested Citation
McMillan, S.J., 1991, Food and nutrition policy issues in remote aboriginal communities: lessons from Arnhem Land, Edition:1991/12/01, Volume:15, Journal Article, viewed 18 November 2019, https://www.nintione.com.au/?p=14494.

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