Ethical Relationships for Biodiversity Research and Benefit-Sharing with Indigenous Peoples

Ethical Relationships for Biodiversity Research and Benefit-Sharing with Indigenous Peoples Journal Article

Macquarie Journal of International and Comparative Environmental Law

  • Author(s): Craig, Donna, Davies, Michael
  • Published: 2005
  • Volume: 2

Abstract: Indigenous peoples hold responsibility for, manage, and own resources and knowledge about plant and animal use, including methods of preparation, storage and management, which is of global economic significance. These peoples’ knowledge of biological and genetic resources already forms the basis for sizeable seed, pharmaceutical and natural product industries. Natural resource management, soil fertility maintenance, stream and coastal conservation and forest and agricultural system models provide viable, time-tested options for sustainable development adapted to microclimate variations and local socio-political ecosystems. Yet Indigenous peoples confront increasing external pressures to provide information, contribute their knowledge and practices, and endorse developments involving their lands, territories, biological and genetic resources, and cultural products and performances. Even recognition of the contributions that Indigenous knowledge has made in the past to world food and medicinal sources, as well as Indigenous peoples’ current significant contributions to agriculture, water and forest management, has done little to offset these peoples’ political marginalisation.

Notes: MqJlICEnvLaw 8

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Suggested Citation
Craig, Donna, Davies, Michael, 2005, Ethical Relationships for Biodiversity Research and Benefit-Sharing with Indigenous Peoples, Volume:2, Journal Article, viewed 17 August 2019, https://www.nintione.com.au/?p=2624.

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