Energy security on remote Aboriginal communities during the COVID-19 crisis

Energy security on remote Aboriginal communities during the COVID-19 crisis Electronic Book Section

CAEPR Topical Issue: Indigenous Australians and the COVID-19 crisis: perspectives on public policy

  • Author(s): Riley, Brad
  • Secondary Author(s): Markham, F, Smith, D, Morphy, F
  • Published: 2020
  • Publisher: Australian National University, Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research (CAEPR)
  • Volume: 1/2020

Abstract: The current serious threat facing Indigenous communities has led many organisations in northern Australia to take the precaution of sending vulnerable community members back to remote homelands in an effort to physically isolate residents from COVID-19.After many years in which the focus of investment and government policy has moved toward larger communities and towns, the physical and organisational infrastructure supporting many smaller remote communities will likely be tried in new ways, as myriad and cross-cutting issues add complexity and cost to the challenge of remaining healthy on remote communities. Remote communities are likely to be tested disproportionately during the current crisis (Whiting &Handley,2020). In many communities, structural factors such as inadequate and poor-quality housing, fixed high energy use appliances (McKenzie,2013),overcrowded and under-serviced households, and high levels of residential mobility will present immediate challenges to residents, communities, service providers and policymakers over the coming months.

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Suggested Citation
Riley, Brad, 2020, Energy security on remote Aboriginal communities during the COVID-19 crisis, Volume:1/2020, Electronic Book Section, viewed 03 July 2022, https://www.nintione.com.au/?p=20646.

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