Differences in growth among remote and town-dwelling Aboriginal children in the Kimberley region of Western Australia

Differences in growth among remote and town-dwelling Aboriginal children in the Kimberley region of Western Australia Journal Article

Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health

  • Author(s): Rousham, E. K., Gracey, M.
  • Published: 1998
  • Publisher: Blackwell Publishing Ltd
  • Volume: 22
  • ISBN: 1753-6405

Abstract: This paper documents the growth of Aboriginal children in remote communities and gazetted towns of the Kimberley region in the far north of Western Australia over the past 20 years. The study's specific aim was to compare the height and weight growth of children in different environments from birth to five years of age. From 1979 to 1983, children living in towns were significantly taller and heavier than their counterparts in remote communities. From 1984 to 1988 and thereafter, there were no significant differences in the growth patterns of children in towns and remote communities. Overall, weight-for-age and height-for-age of children in remote communities has improved since the 1970s relative to their town-dwelling counterparts. These changes in growth shed light on the quality of the social and physical environment over the past 20 years and may assist with the development of future programs for child health.

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Suggested Citation
Rousham, E. K., Gracey, M., 1998, Differences in growth among remote and town-dwelling Aboriginal children in the Kimberley region of Western Australia, Volume:22, Journal Article, viewed 19 September 2019, https://www.nintione.com.au/?p=10968.

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