Conservation of critically endangered wildlife species – scope for private landholder and citizens’ action

Conservation of critically endangered wildlife species – scope for private landholder and citizens’ action Conference Paper

16th Australian Rangeland Society Biennial Conference

  • Author(s): MacLeod, N.D., Kearney, F.C., Spooner, H., Woods, M.
  • Published: 2010
  • Publisher: Australian Rangeland Society

Abstract: The conservation status of wildlife on private grazing land is contentious. For macropods this ranges from ubiquitous pest species (e.g. kangaroos) to critically endangered for many of the smaller macropods, including the Bridled Nailtail Wallaby, which was thought to be extinct until ‘rediscovery’ in 1973 in Central Queensland. Recovery activities for the Bridled Nailtail Wallaby in Queensland are being undertaken at Taunton N.P. (Scientific) and Idalia N.P. A third reintroduction effort commenced on “Avocet”, a grazing property in the Central Highlands in 2001; and presently involves a consortium of interests including a pastoral enterprise, a sporting shooters association, community volunteers, a conservation trust and the Department of Environment and Resource Management (DERM). The paper details elements of the history of wallaby recovery efforts on “Avocet” and how this model might offer scope for private individuals and community interests to contribute to endangered species conservation outside the formal conservation estate.

Cite this document

Suggested Citation
MacLeod, N.D., Kearney, F.C., Spooner, H., Woods, M., 2010, Conservation of critically endangered wildlife species – scope for private landholder and citizens’ action, Conference Paper, viewed 07 August 2022, https://www.nintione.com.au/?p=3591.

Endnote Mendeley Zotero Export Google Scholar

Share this page

Search again