Can a mortality excess in remote areas of Australia be explained by Indigenous status? A case study using neonatal mortality in Queensland

Can a mortality excess in remote areas of Australia be explained by Indigenous status? A case study using neonatal mortality in Queensland Journal Article

Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health

  • Author(s): Coory, Michael
  • Published: 2003
  • Publisher: Blackwell Publishing Ltd
  • Volume: 27
  • ISBN: 1753-6405

Abstract: Objective:To assess the extent to which Indigenous status confounds the association between remoteness and neonatal mortality in Queensland. Methods:We used routine data from the Queensland Perinatal Data Collection. Poisson regression modelling was used to assess confounding. Results:Babies born to Indigenous mothers have mortality rates 2.42 times those of the rest of the population, regardless of whether they live in urban, rural or remote areas (95% CI 2.09–2.80). The babies of non-Indigenous women who live in remote areas have a low risk of neonatal death, similar to their rural and urban counterparts. Conclusion:In Queensland, the key demographic variable that determines neonatal mortality is Indigenous status, not remoteness. Implications:Policymakers should not assume that an excess of a particular health problem in remote areas necessarily reflects equal disadvantage for all the Australians who live there.

Cite this document

Suggested Citation
Coory, Michael, 2003, Can a mortality excess in remote areas of Australia be explained by Indigenous status? A case study using neonatal mortality in Queensland, Volume:27, Journal Article, viewed 25 July 2024, https://www.nintione.com.au/?p=11002.

Endnote Mendeley Zotero Export Google Scholar

Share this page

Search again