Burning Daylight: Contemporary Indigenous dance, loss and cultural intuition

Burning Daylight: Contemporary Indigenous dance, loss and cultural intuition Book Section

Ethics and the Arts

  • Author(s): Swain, Rachael
  • Secondary Author(s): Macneill, Paul
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: Springer Netherlands
  • ISBN: 978-94-017-8816-8

Abstract: Drawing on an analysis of choreographic processes developed in situ in remote Western Australia, it is concluded that alternative approaches to ‘listening’ are required to allow new forms of Indigenous storytelling to emerge. The chapter presents a practice-based account to how this ‘listening’ might function by outlining the development of an experimental dance theatre process in close association with Indigenous elders and their custodianship of ‘country.’ The legacy of the forced removals under the Western Australian assimilation policies of the last century and its impact on dance and story, as well as current definitions of ‘tradition’ and continuous connection to country under native title law, are examined in order to consider the creation of contemporary dance in a context of loss. The performer’s response of ‘dancing back’ to the intrusions faced by their community are presented in a series of case studies taken from rehearsal notes.

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Suggested Citation
Swain, Rachael, 2014, Burning Daylight: Contemporary Indigenous dance, loss and cultural intuition, Book Section, viewed 15 June 2024, https://www.nintione.com.au/?p=15760.

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