Antioxidant biomarkers and cardiometabolic risk markers in an Aboriginal community in remote Australia: a cross-sectional study

Antioxidant biomarkers and cardiometabolic risk markers in an Aboriginal community in remote Australia: a cross-sectional study Journal Article

Public Health Nutrition

  • Author(s): Knudsen, Lenette, Lyons, Jasmine G., O’Dea, Kerin, Christensen, Dirk L., Brimblecombe, Julie K.
  • Published: 2020
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press
  • ISBN: 1368-9800

Abstract: Objective: High-quality diets, characterised by nutrient-rich foods, are one of the foundations for health and well-being. Indicators of diet quality, antioxidants, are associated with protection against cardiometabolic diseases. The current study explores relationships between plasma antioxidants and cardiometabolic risk among Aboriginal people in Australia. Design: As part of a community-driven health promotion programme, we conducted a cross-sectional study including a health-behaviour questionnaire, plasma antioxidants and cardiometabolic risk markers (anthropometric, blood pressure measurements, fasting glucose, glycated Hb (HbA1c), lipids, C-reactive protein and albumin-creatinine-ratio) continuous and categorised into population-specific cut-offs. Antioxidants (β-carotene, β-cryptoxanthin, lycopene, lutein-zeaxanthin, retinol and α-tocopherol measured using HPLC) were applied to a principal component analysis, which aggregated these into a single component. Linear regression models were applied to investigate associations between the antioxidant component and cardiometabolic risk markers. Setting: Community in a remote area in Northern Territory, Australia. Participants: A total of 324 Aboriginal people, mean age 35·5 (range 15–75) years. Results: Antioxidant component levels were higher among individuals with higher self-reported vegetable intake (P < 0·01), higher among individuals with higher self-reported fruit intake (P = 0·05) and lower among current smokers (P = 0·06). Linear regression revealed an inverse association between the antioxidant component and C-reactive protein (β = –0·01, P < 0·01) after adjusting for confounders. Conclusion: Higher plasma antioxidant levels, indicators of diet quality, were associated with lower levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein in this Aboriginal population in remote Australia. This association suggests plasma antioxidants may be protective against inflammation; however, longitudinal studies are needed to examine this potentially protective relationship.

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Suggested Citation
Knudsen, Lenette, Lyons, Jasmine G., O’Dea, Kerin, Christensen, Dirk L., Brimblecombe, Julie K., 2020, Antioxidant biomarkers and cardiometabolic risk markers in an Aboriginal community in remote Australia: a cross-sectional study, Journal Article, viewed 16 July 2024, https://www.nintione.com.au/?p=22800.

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