Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander continence training in rural and remote Australia

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander continence training in rural and remote Australia Conference Paper

11th National Rural Health Conference: Rural and remote Australia: the heart of a healthy nation

  • Author(s): Ailsa Sutherland, Jessica Billimoria
  • Published: 2011

Abstract: Incontinence is a common health condition with significant physical, social and economic implications. Current research indicates that 4.6 million people in Australia or 21% of people living in the community are affected by some degree of incontinence. Despite its high incidence, incontinence is too often accepted as ‘just a normal part of ageing’. In reality, incontinence affects every age group and is common co-morbidity with a range of life stages (e.g. pregnancy or menopause) and chronic conditions (e.g. diabetes or asthma). In addition to this, there are a range of factors which put people at a higher risk of incontinence, including: • being overweight or obese • being female • having a baby • smoking, or • excessive alcohol consumption. Very few studies have investigated the prevalence of incontinence amongst Indigenous Australians, although Millard et al reported that the prevalence of urinary incontinence among Aboriginal women living in rural areas is likely to be high. Considering the increased prevalence of some chronic conditions amongst Indigenous communities, incontinence is believed to be a problem among a higher than average number of Indigenous people. As the peak body for continence promotion, management and advocacy, the Continence Foundation of Australia (CFA) works to ‘raise community awareness about bladder and bowel health and the prevention of incontinence.’ These awareness-raising and education activities target all segments of the community, and recently the CFA has undertaken a number of projects targeting health professionals who provide services for Indigenous Australians in rural and remote regions.

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Suggested Citation
Ailsa Sutherland, Jessica Billimoria, 2011, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander continence training in rural and remote Australia, Conference Paper, viewed 15 August 2022, https://www.nintione.com.au/?p=3081.

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