Aboriginal agency, knowledge, and voice: Centring Kulintja southern methodologies

Aboriginal agency, knowledge, and voice: Centring Kulintja southern methodologies Book Section

A Sociolinguistics of the South

  • Author(s): Osborne, Samuel
  • Published: 2021
  • Publisher: Routledge
  • ISBN: 9781315208916

Abstract: Indigenous scholars continue to argue for decolonial approaches to research in Indigenous communities. This work involves challenging accepted institutionally generated ‘truths’ about Indigenous experiences and realities – often framed in deficit terms – and calling for methodological reform (Smith, 1999) that shifts research-generated truth-making from power-laden (monologic) approaches towards what Haraway (1988) calls ‘power-sensitive’ dialogue. Attention is drawn to the inadequacy of monologic research instruments dependent upon English for relevant education provision for Aboriginal communities. The purpose here is to demonstrate the relationality among Indigenous Australian epistemologies, ontologies, and languages, and allow for centring decolonial and southern methodologies in educational planning, provision, and research. A process of ‘decolonizing’ survey and research methodology is traced over a seven-year period through three sets of survey instruments and a collaborative research project with Anangu researchers and three Anangu communities in remote southern Northern Territory. The use of first language narrative and a ‘consensual conversation’ (Maturana & Cabezon, 2001) approach encourages young people to make powerful assertions on their aspirations for education and the future. It renews focus on urgently needed Aboriginal languages and policy reform and investment, particularly in local Aboriginal educator workforce development, teacher preparation pedagogy and programmes, and the production of high-quality first language resources. Indigenous scholars continue to argue for decolonial approaches to research in Indigenous communities. This work involves challenging accepted institutionally generated ‘truths’ about Indigenous experiences and realities – often framed in deficit terms – and calling for methodological reform (Smith, 1999) that shifts research-generated, truth-making from power-laden (monologic) approaches towards what Haraway (1988) calls ‘power-sensitive’ dialogue.

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Suggested Citation
Osborne, Samuel, 2021, Aboriginal agency, knowledge, and voice: Centring Kulintja southern methodologies, Book Section, viewed 22 October 2021, https://www.nintione.com.au/?p=26687.

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